IDL-SIG Webinar: Making Instructional Video

Last updated: April 5, 2014

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Making Instructional Video: What We Learn from Pro-Am Content on the Web

When: Wed, Apr 16, 2014 1:30 PM – 3:00 PM EDT

Registration: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/3021021804461343234

Increasingly, users of all manner of technology (software, most notably) are turning to their peers on the Web for guidance. There, users find a mix of homegrown instructional content that ranges in quality from frightfully bad to quite good, with plenty in between. Where users are not turning for help is to printed documentation, instead preferring to roll the dice with peer-generated content. Often it is because of the convenience of access and convenience of delivery that this instructional content is so popular.

In this webinar, Jason Swarts (North Carolina State University) considers what lessons can be learned about producing effective instructional video by looking at popular and well-rated content on the Web. By studying a corpus of bad and good video, Swarts derives a rubric for assessing and creating video, one that can help technical communicators learn to produce professional-grade content that will appeal to an elusive user base.

Jason Swarts is an associate professor of technical communication at North Carolina State University. He teaches courses on information design, networked communication, and discourse analysis. His research is on new media, mobile information technologies, and computer-supported cooperative work.

Wednesday, April 16, 2014
Time:
1:30 PM – 3:00 PM EDT
12:30 – 2:00 CDT CST
11:30 – 1:00 MDT
10:30 – 12:00 PDT

Payment Information:
$20 IDL SIG Member
$30 STC Member
$50 Non Member

Registration: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/3021021804461343234

After you register, a payment page will appear. If your payment method is not in your name (such as your employer's credit card), make the payment and then contact programs at stcidlsig.org with your registration name and the payment name. If you do not receive a confirmation email, please contact programs at stcidlsig.org.

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Multiple system atrophy (MSA)

Last updated: April 5, 2014

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Multiple system atrophy (MSA) is a rare neurological disorder that impairs your body's involuntary (autonomic) functions, including blood pressure, heart rate, bladder function and digestion. Formerly called Shy-Drager syndrome, the condition shares many Parkinson's disease-like symptoms, such as slowness of movement, muscle rigidity and poor balance.

Multiple system atrophy is a degenerative disease that develops in adulthood, usually in the 50s or 60s, and affects more men than women. The condition progresses gradually and eventually leads to death.

Treatment for MSA includes medications and lifestyle changes to help manage symptoms.

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PANDAS

Last updated: March 21, 2014

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PANDAS, is an abbreviation for Pediatric Autoimmune Neuropsychiatric Disorders Associated with Streptococcal Infections. The term is used to describe a subset of children who have Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) and/or tic disorders such as Tourette Syndrome, and in whom symptoms worsen following strep infections such as “Strep throat” and Scarlet Fever.

U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH), National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)
  • ClinicalTrials.gov Ongoing Studies of Intravenous Immunoglobulin for PANDAS, ClinicalTrials.gov A service of the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH), National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)
  • ABC News report PANDAS: Strep Throat Can Lead to OCD in Children, October 5, 2014, by Susan Donaldson James via Good Morning America.
  • PANDAS: Frequently Asked Questions about Pediatric Autoimmune Neuropsychiatric Disorders Associated with Streptococcal Infections. Provided by the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH), National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH).
  • PANDAS Resource Network is a national non-profit organization dedicated solely to fighting PANDAS disorder through a combination of research, education, and awareness.
  • PANDAS Network The information here has been gathered largely by a group of 20 parents whose children had the sudden onset of PANDAS in 2007-2008. Initially, four families near Palo Alto, California – Stanford University – all developed PANDAS near the same time in 2007. Over the past three years we have discovered 20 more families ill with strep and PANDAS-onset in 2007-8. We found each other through one caring local Neuropsychiatrist and a blog. This PANDAS Network is managed by mothers of children who have struggled with PANDAS and overcome it through treatment with antibiotics and ultimately IVIG. We are have also built a small base of volunteers who will help answer your concerns.
  • PANDAS and PITAND Syndromes Controversial and still highly contentious concepts of PANDAS (Paediatric Autoimmune Neuropsychiatric Disorders Associated with Streptococci) and PITAND (Paediatric Infection-triggered Autoimmune Neuropsychiatric Disorders) were introduced by A. J. Allen and Swedo et al. in the late nineties. This website lists Updated PANDAS signs and symptoms
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Talk to the Elephant: Design for Behavior Change webinar

Last updated: February 25, 2014

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Announcing the IDL-SIG’s March Webinar “Talk to the Elephant: Design for Behavior Change” on Mar 19, 2014 1:30 PM EDT
Speaker: Julie Dirksen
Register at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/3372555462276337153

Frequently, learning design is about showing people how to do the right things, but actually getting them to change behavior can be another challenge. It’s particularly challenging to get people to change those intractable habits and behaviors that we all struggle to avoid, despite the wealth of available information about better choices.

In this session, you will learn:
– How to identify and understand the barriers to behavior change
– Ways to design solutions that don’t just inform learners, but inspire behavior change
– How to use specific models and technique for designing a change effort

About our Speaker: Julie Dirksen

Julie Dirksen instructional designer who has almost 20 years’ experience creating highly interactive e-Learning experiences for clients ranging from Fortune 500 companies to innovative technology startups to major grant-funded research initiatives. Her focus has been on utilizing the disciplines of educational psychology, neuroscience, change management and persuasive technology to promote and support the improvement of peoples’ lives through sustainable long-term learning and behavioral change.

Time:
1:30 PM – 3:00 PM EDT
12:30 – 2:00 CDT CST
11:30 – 1:00 MDT
10:30 – 12:00 PDT

Payment Information:
$20 IDL SIG Member
$30 STC Member
$50 Non Member

After you register, a payment page will appear. If your payment method is not in your name (such as your employer’s credit card), make the payment and then contact email hidden; JavaScript is required with your registration name and the payment name. If you do not receive a confirmation email, please contact email hidden; JavaScript is required.

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.

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